Powerful Units for Back to School

The summer has been so wonderful! I got to visit Costa Rica with a group of students who were SO excited to use their Spanish in the real world! I got to float in my pool sooooo many days because it has been unseasonably warm! My hibiscus plants were the most beautiful I’ve ever had. The bird feeders have been busy now that our trees are bigger! I had an amazing cohort and got some good quality time (and food) in St. Petersburg at iFLT. I wrote a new book! (Watch for Bananas this fall!) From time with my family and pets to lots of lunches with friends, I have milked this summer for all it’s worth. Now my brain is starting that slow transition back to “planning mode”.

As I consider what units I will shift around this year, I thought I would make a short summary of some of the things that you’ll find in the units I write! Remember that the structures you want or need to teach can be added to any unit! If something seems to have a lot of present tense, add reps of past tense structures by retelling stories, asking what students (or people in general) used to do. Make predictions to get future reps! Need to teach subjunctive? Just ask for recommendations, give suggestions, or find out what they think is important! The value of a good unit is that the CONTENT you are delivering can be the vehicle that helps them acquire language that can be used in any context!

I’m attaching a document with a break down of (and links to) some of my content based units that might help with your planning as you go back to school! I am working on one last one… green energy Costa Rica style! (The research for this one was fun!) Hope I can have it ready to kick off the year and talk to my students about my trip! Like them all? Try the SUPER BUNDLE!

Happy planning! I hope that as you enjoy your last few weeks of summer, these ready-made units let you relax a little longer!

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7 thoughts on “Powerful Units for Back to School

  1. Hi there, I’m searching for STEM type activities that my students could work hands-on together for the first day(s) of school. I, of course, want them to be related to Spanish and I thought you would be the person to start with since you have a passion for science and Spanish. I want students to have to think outside-of-the- box and construct something that is related to my content area (high school Spanish I). My idea is that they will “race” against other groups to construct their product and then we can discuss differences, benefits, and processes afterwards. I’ve searched high and low on TPT and all I can find is a STEM activity in which students work in groups to construct chinampas from a study on Aztec floating gardens. Any ideas or directions you can offer would be appreciated. Thanks so much and happy planning!

    On Fri, Jul 26, 2019 at 7:23 PM Somewhere to Share wrote:

    > senoracmt posted: ” The summer has been so wonderful! I got to visit Costa > Rica with a group of students who were SO excited to use their Spanish in > the real world! I got to float in my pool sooooo many days because it has > been unseasonably warm! My hibiscus plants were the” >

    • I think repurposing products to keep plastics out of the landfills could be a cool stem activity. We do that in my zero waste unit and Marta Yedinak did it as a follow up to Mar de plástico. You could do something with green energy sources. I’ve seen several solar ovens that are classroom experiments as I’ve been researching my green energy unit!

  2. Thanks for all you do and all you share! In your post, you mention that there are some links in your What’s in a Unit? share. I couldn’t get any of them to work. Which ones are active links?

  3. Carrie,
    Thank you for your inspiring units! I too have a passion for the environment and taking care of our natural resources, and I love that you’ve incorporated those values through your love of science and travel. They are a wonderful springboard for teaching upper levels in an engaging and current way!

  4. Pingback: Getting you ready to go #BTS19 – Somewhere to Share

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